splash
dialogue of the psyche
DREAMS: sequence images, sounds and feelings experienced when sleeping
SEMANTICS: linguistics. the study of meaning.

http://www.dreamsemantics.com/2009/02/the-wise-old-man/

This archetype was described as Carl Jung as a person with great judgment and wisdom.  The wise old man is sometimes referred to as the Sage. This archetype is characterized by being old, bearded, father-figure type who uses his great personal knowledge of the world and offer guidance through stories and may impress upon his [...]

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Dreams – Repositories of Emotion


http://www.dreamsemantics.com/2009/01/dreams-%e2%80%93-repositories-of-emotion/

Kaloo scampered about me, leaping at me and licking my neck and face while I held him for a few seconds, every time he put his muzzle against me. My heart was bursting with the joy of my loving pet’s company. I don’t remember how long it lasted but some reckless moment in time put an end to the sweet dream and I opened my eyes to the view of my lonely room. It was December 06, 2008 – more than 9 years after Kaloo’s death (the lachrymose night of June 20, 1999). With a heavy heart, still beating the rhythm of the happy dream, I got up to face the challenges of the day.

This recent dream of my late pet dog is not a rare experience of an emotional scene set in a unique mental studio. Seeing my late kin close to me, the living ones departing, and a range of other emotional situations, has become a familiar phenomenon that repeats itself, every now and then, without any conscious effort. Dreams connect me to the past; take me to the future; and even paint a living and breathing picture of my present – all this without charging me a dime. Generous dreams!

The question of how our dreaming faculty shoots these fascinating, one-time videos may be reserved for some other time. At the moment, it sounds pertinent to reflect on the value of emotionality contained in our dreams. Many, or most, dreams have a high emotional value: some leave you happy; some induce gloom; yet others bring erotic passion. Every time you wake up from an emotionally-laden dream, your physical and mental status is recharged with respect to energy and mood. At times, you may find it hard to walk after experiencing a spooky scene; and then there are moments when a visit from some long-dead kin leaves you in peace for several hours after you are out of the dream. In all cases, it is obvious that dreams provide an outlet and an inlet for managing our emotional needs.

While it may sound nothing extraordinary, dreams must be credited as an invaluable and rare means of managing emotions. In our times, when a 9 to 5 job and the myriad of other headaches demand a check on emotive displays, dreams are the resort of satiating our emotional needs without restraint. Fear, sorrow, anger, joy, and regret are dissipated from the unconscious via the virtual cinema that runs before the dreamer – free of cost. Take the dreams away and you hardly expect to manage the emotional energy that constantly sprouts from your instincts and their responses to life experiences. Continual suppression of emotions, without an effective outlet, can give us to one or more long-term psychological problems including anxiety and depression.

Also interesting, and important, is the role dreams play in reinforcing the emotional settings of the dreamer with respect to other people, things, and places in his life. Thus, when I watch my deceased aunt patting my cheek with affection, my familial fondness for my mom’s sisters is reinforced as I receive the emotional reward from their side, albeit from a woman who passed away 16 years ago. One can consciously think of those lost love ones and get connected emotionally. But the emotional experience of dreams is stronger, more immediate, spontaneous, and more rewarding than wakeful reflections in which the personal sense of self (the ‘I’), always dominates the consciousness.

Dreams are our inexhaustible repositories of storing, receiving, and mending the emotive paraphernalia whose suppression would otherwise pose a serious psychological problem of alienation.

Author: Ernest Dempsey

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